• Cultural Calendar
Standing Against Slavery and Honoring the Victims on Slavery Remembrance Day

The slave trade has always been one of the most horrific infringements of human rights across all of human history. And worst of all was the 400-year transatlantic slave trade that victimized over 15 million men, women, and children forcibly removed from their tribes, villages, and homes in Africa.

Created by UNESCO to memorialize the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade, Slavery Remembrance Day, also known as International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition, is observed on August 23 worldwide. Upon this day, it’s important that we remember that this observance is not only a reminder of the horrors of slavery as we honor its victims — it’s also about our dedication across the globe to ensure that slavery, and the racism that caused it, is abolished once and for all.

Read President Biden’s statement marking the importance of Slavery Remembrance Day for August 2022 here.

 

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Observing Wounded Knee Day

Also known as Wounded Knee Day of Reflection, Wounded Knee Day honors the memory of the over 200 (some estimate as many as 300) Lakota Sioux men, women, and children who were massacred by the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment near Wounded Knee Creek on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. 

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Celebrating Native American Heritage in November

With over 9 million Native Americans in the United States today, from over 500 different federally recognized tribes, and with 29 of those tribes within the state of Washington. PSESD is proud to have the opportunity to celebrate Native American Heritage Month (also known as American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month) and pay tribute to the diversity, rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans in our districts. 

Read More about Celebrating Native American Heritage in November